Brain-derived neurotrophic factor response in vulnerable and resilient genetic lines in the chick anxiety-depression model

Author(s): Loria MJ, White SW, Robbins SA,Salmeto AL, Hymel KA, et al.

Abstract

Altered BDNF-mediated synaptogenesis is a major contributor to stress-vulnerability and depression. This study sought to determine patterns of hippocampal BDNF expression in stress-vulnerable and -resilient strains in the chick anxiety–depression model. Socially raised Black Australorp and Production Red strains were tested at 5–6 days post hatch under either 30, 60, 90, or 120 min of social separation stress; chicks tested with 2 social companions for 120 min served as controls. Distress vocalizations were recorded throughout the test session and latency to behavioral despair calculated. Following tests, bilateral hippocampal sections were harvested and analyzed via ELISA for BDNF levels. Black Australorps had shorter latencies to behavioral despair than Production Reds reflecting greater stress vulnerability. No differences were detected in BDNF levels between a No-Test and Social group within or between strains. The stress resilient Production Reds showed stable BDNF levels across the isolation test period whereas the vulnerable Black Australorps showed an increase in hippocampal BDNF levels that peaked at 90 min and declined thereafter. These findings fit well with the notion that strain-dependent stress-vulnerability reflects, in part, poor homeostatic mechanisms controlling synaptogenesis.

Similar Articles

Drug delivery to the posterior segment of the eye

Author(s): Lee TWY, RobinsonJR

Development andevaluation of prolonged release topical indomethacin formulations for ocularinflammation

Author(s): AdelliGR, Balguri SP, Punyamurthula N, Bhagav P, Majumdar S

Theblood-ocular barriers

Author(s): Cunha-Vaz J

Drug delivery to the retina: challenges and opportunities

Author(s): Duvvuri S,Majumdar S, Mitra AK

Ocularpreparations: the formulation approach

Author(s): Kaur IP, Kanwar M

Evaluation of topical hesperetin matrix filmfor back-of-the-eye delivery

Author(s): Adelli GR, Hingorani T, PunyamurthulaN, Balguri SP, Majumdar S

Ocular inserts - Advancement in therapy of eye diseases

Author(s): Kumari A, Sharma PK, Garg VK,Garg G

Ocular inserts for topical delivery

Author(s): SaettoneFM, Salminen L

Stability of benzocaine formulated in commercialoral disintegrating tablet platforms

Author(s): Köllmer M, Popescu C, Manda P,Zhou L, Gemeinhart RA

New methods of drug delivery

Author(s): Langer R

Iontophoretic drug delivery for the treatment ofscars

Author(s): Manda P, Angamuthu M, HiremathSR, Raman V, Murthy SN

Polysulfone capillary fiber forintraocular drug delivery: in vitro and in vivo evaluations

Author(s): Rahimy MH, PeymanGA, Chin SY, Golshani R, Aras C, et al.

Intravitreal sustained-releaseganciclovir

Author(s): Smith TJ, Pearson PA, BlandfordDL, Brown JD, Goins KA, et al.

Delivery of cefotaxime to the brain viaintranasal administration

Author(s): Manda P, Hargett JK, Kiran Vaka SR,Repka MA, Narasimha Murthy S

Biodegradable Intrascleral Implant for SustainedIntraocular Delivery of Betamethasone Phosphate

Author(s): Okabe J, Kimura H, Kunou N, OkabeK, Kato A, et al.

Delivery of ziconotide to cerebrospinalfluid via intranasal pathway for the treatment of chronic pain

Author(s): Manda P, Kushwaha AS, Kundu S,Shivakumar H, Jo SB, et al.

Episcleral implants for topotecandelivery to the posterior segment of the eye

Author(s): Carcaboso AM, Chiappetta DA,Opezzo JA, Höcht C, Fandiño AC, et al.